HomeAbout UsBendheim GalleryEventsEducation / ClassesProgramsFacility RentalSupport / DonateContact Us

PUT on YOUR FACE and HAND ME DOWN
Curated by Ben Quesnel

Opening Thursday October 24th 
Continuing through Tuesday November 21st, 2019
at The Bendheim Gallery
Featured Artists:​
Zeren Badar, Michael Chang, Neil Daigle Orians, Sonia Delaunay, Alexandra Grau, 
Jeila Gueramian, Aaron Johnson, Trevon Latin, Motomichi Nakamura, Rebecca Ness, 
Rose Nestler, Juliana Stankiewicz and Andy Warhol.


Zeren Badar
Michael Chang
Neil Daigle Orians
Opening Night on October 24th with LIVE makeup demonstration by Tyler Green
Jelia Gueramian
Aaron Johnson
Trevon Latin
Sonia Delaunay
 Installation by Motomichi Nakamura
Rebecca Ness
Rose Nestler
Juliana Stankiewicz
Andy Warhol
Alexandra Grau
PUT on YOUR FACE and HAND ME DOWN is a group exhibition that explores the psychological relationships that we develop with the things that we wear as well as the general associations that are attached to different articles of clothing and fabrics to re-create reminiscence of the past. Like an overflowing closet, the space is filled with pieces that contain a variety of interpretations; clothing reduced down to its materiality to garments that contain a sentimental value equivalent to heirlooms. Exhibiting artists use photography, sculpture, installation, painting, video, and projection to explore these different connections. 

Neil Daigle-Orians latest series, "heart on my sleeve," utilizes his old clothing to convey his fascination with tensions that exist between binary structures, gender, personal, private and digital space. Rose Nestler’s soft sculptures use associative psychological connotations of abstracted clothing to examine issues of power, attraction and gender. Expanding upon the clothing theme, Aaron Johnson mimics brush strokes with his selected medium of socks, elevating this humble item to a crafted artifact, simultaneously absurd and beautiful. Rebecca Ness is interested in how bodies interact creating new pattern and spatial form. 


Juliana Stankiewicz’s Mannequin series is an exploration of societal values placed on women and contemporary disguises, with Andy Warhol’s silkscreens offering a layered commentary on feminine beauty. Jeila Gueramian creates a new reality of her familial memories with her intricate crochet patterns, while Trevon Latin pieces together remnants of his childhood to investigate his complicated relationships with religion, self-worth and identity. Zeren Badar obscures parts of well-known paintings with food items, showing his interest in Pop Art, Dada and Surrealism. Taiwanese American Michael Chang references cultural and patriarchal memory and reinvention with his tailored approach of dissecting, fragmenting and re-assembling. The more lucid, flowing, hand-dyed, textile-based sculptures of Peruvian Alexandra Grau also evoke strong historic and cultural ritual. The art of Ukrainian-born French artist Sonia Delaunay, is noted for strong colors and geometric shapes. Emphasizing similarly bold geometry is the site-specific installation by Motomichi Nakamura which plays with urban scale, decoration and Japanese anime forms.